Everyone can benefit from content marketing, even if you think you can’t

I was at a networking event recently and somebody asked what I did. I explained I help businesses with their content marketing and copywriting. 

After some discussion, they said that content marketing wouldn’t work for their business as what they do is boring and nobody would be interested in reading what they’ve got to say – they worked in car finance.

So, is this true? Does content marketing only work for certain types of businesses? 

I believe that any business can use content marketing to support their business goals, but before we get into that, first let’s see why businesses should be focusing on content marketing. 

Reasons to focus on content marketing 

The Content Marketing Institute states that businesses are willing to dedicate 40% of their marketing budget to content marketing. 

Why? Well, research shows that content marketing: 

  • Increases engagement
  • Builds lasting relationships with people, which in time turns into brand loyalty 
  • Costs 3 times less to grow the sales pipeline than it is using traditional forms of marketing
  • Can be ‘evergreen’ content – meaning it will still be relevant and searchable in years to come
  • Helps businesses to build authority and credibility – meaning you can charge a premium for your product / service

Companies doing content marketing really well

Any business in any industry has insights and information that people will be searching for. Central to doing content marketing well is knowing who these people are and what interests them. 

For example, as a content marketer and copywriter, I’ve planned and written content for a massive variety of businesses, including a jacuzzi pump company, a supplier of bathroom taps, and a scented candle company. 

While you and I may not want to read their content, someone out there will and just one piece of content could inspire and persuade them to contact the company for more information or to make a purchase. 

To prove my point that content marketing can work for all business types, here’s a roundup of companies who I think do content marketing really well:

Littlebird 

Littlebird is a marketplace for people who are looking for affordable activities to do with kids, this may be a day out or a weekend break. 

Along with having a quality website and active social media accounts, they send daily emails with details of new offers. Now, you may be thinking daily emails sounds a bit too much, and for any other type of brand it may be, but for them, it works as they’ve always got something new to entice people with. 

As you can see from the examples, their emails are well laid out – offers are easy to see with the price clearly visible, they use a lot of high quality images that are attention-grabbing and the content is very well-written which makes it a pleasure to read and the content is really targeted to their audience. 

Innocent 

Yes, Innocent is a big company who probably employs a ton of people to work on their marketing, but I’ve included them on my list because they’re consistent with their content marketing messages and they aren’t afraid to have fun with them. 

From the packaging on their products, tweets to the content on their website, they adopt a playful tone: 

Source: innocentdrinks.co.uk

I particularly love the contact us section  – call the bananaphone! 

Innocent are very bold in their use of language – most brands wouldn’t feel comfortable being this casual – but it works for them because they’ve used it from the start, so it’s become inbuilt into their brand. 

Lidl

Lidl is another brand that is using a personalised tone to communicate with their customers. As well as this, they really know what their customers want: quality at low prices, an easy shopping experience and variety  – that’s why their ‘The Middle of Lidl’ aisle is so popular. 

This tweet sums up perfectly what customers experience when shopping in Lidl – you go in the essentials but then enticed by the ‘Middle of Lid’ special offers: 

And, the theme is continued with their email marketing: they’re making life easier by including easy to cook, fresh recipes – the choice of image here really sells this recipe and details of upcoming ‘The Middle of Lidl’ deals:  

Picking the parts of content marketing to focus on 

Basically, content marketing is an umbrella term for lots of different marketing activities like blog writing, video marketing, social media marketing, case studies, eBooks, white papers, infographics etc. 

The end goal of any of these activities is to support your overall business goals. For example, if you want to domineer Instagram, you’d focus your attention on posting high-quality and relevant images with related hashtags and engaging with followers who comment on your posts. 

Or, if you’re a B2B brand, you might use your resources to build a following on LinkedIn, where you’d post regular updates, share information from your industry or update people on what is happening within your business. 

Unless you have a big marketing team that’s filled with experts and a large marketing budget, trying to spread yourself across all areas of content marketing won’t bring any results. So, it’s more efficient to decide what you can with the resources you’ve got available and put the effort into smashing this, whether it be building a YouTube channel or growing your email marketing list. 

Getting started with content marketing 

I hope the examples show that any business – no matter what industry they’re in or what product / service they offer, can use content marketing to build a brand. 

The key is choosing what parts of content marketing you want to focus on and doing that really well along with understanding what your audience is interested in. 

To get started, download my free content marketing guide.